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What's New 7-17-20

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XL Recordings

Produced over the course of two years, Yaeji started writing with no specific narrative in mind. Through that freedom, melded in cozy and laidback production, the album spans a wide range of sounds, including the Korean indie rock and electronica that she listened to as a teenager in Seoul, and late ’90s and early 2000s hip hop and R&B she grew up listening to.

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XL Recordings

Since breaking through with her first two Eps, Arca’s created an unprecedented body of work drawing from club music, experimental noise, and the ballad tradition of her native Venezuela, while reaching beyond music to encompass performance, visual art, and technology. For KiCk i, Arca pursues pleasure, dignity, and dance floor liberation by refracting club music, reggaeton, and pop through her radical vision.

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Rough Trade

After a legendary career as the enigmatic frontman for Pulp, and a successful run of solo albums and collaborations, Jarvis Cocker debuts his first new full length album since 2009 with musical project JARV IS... an ongoing live experience because life is an ongoing live experience. This is not a live album. It's an alive album.

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Epic

In a departure from the nuanced introspection of her previous work, Fetch the Bolt Cutters is Fiona Apple’s fifth studio album and her first in eight years since 2012’s The Idler Wheel. It’s the sound of a woman freeing herself from the constraints of form, expectation, and establishment — burning everything down to make a profoundly singular work unlike anything that’s ever existed.

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Red Bull Records

Known for their stellar synth-pop melodies, and relatable lyrics about love, loss and everything in-between, pop quartet The Aces have gained worldwide popularity since their 2018 debut album, When My Heart Felt Volcanic. They describe the new record as a "whole new chapter" for them –– an "an exploration" that deepens their previously established feel-good sound.

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Capitol

The intimate collection of songs featured on Manos’ debut EP has been described as raw and deeply personal. The artist explained, “If it feels like looking in on something private, it is”. The New York Times called “Tennessee,” first single, “An electronic lament, Auto-Tuned and steeped in James Blake and Frank Ocean.”

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New West Records

While the Gentlemen’s sound is clearly steeped in the classic roots, rock and pop music of the ‘60s and ‘70s, there’s a dreamy, spacey, and occasionally progressive element. Add in elements of funk, soul, country, r&b, southern rock, gospel and you have more than just a mere album. Rather, Floor It!!! is a rich and righteous ride.

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4AD

While on a surface level, Species is an exploration of the sonic possibilities of the Farfisa organ, aided only by a clarinet and double bass, it’s a nod to both humanity and humility. It’s also about suspended time and trance; not just a steady movement from A to B, but as something that flows, meanders and eddies, like water.

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Blue Note

The session for Just Coolin’ (March 8, 1959) finds The Jazz Messengers’ saxophone chair in transition. The band had last recorded in October 1958 when they cemented their place in jazz history with the classic album Moanin’ featuring Benny Golson on tenor saxophone. By July 1959, Blakey had recruited tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter who would remain a fixture of the band until 1964.

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Columbia

Gaslighter (produced by Fun.’s Jack Antonoff) is the brilliant new album from the superstars, renegades, innovators, heroes, villains, and moms that have grown from a band into a cultural phenomenon. It’s their first new album since 2006's Taking the Long Way, which won five Grammy Awards including "Album of the Year," "Record of the Year," and "Song of the Year."

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